Galapagos Cetacean Whales

Observing Cetacean Whales in the Galapagos Islands is just a one of a kind experience in this wonderful Archipelago

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galapagos cetacean whales

A common question in Galapagos is where and at what time of the day can visitors expect to see whales and or Galapagos Dolphins

Perhaps this has always been a hard question, and it remains without an answer.

The Expedition Staff aboard most of the cruise ships in Galapagos, will always be on the lookout for these amazing marine mammals.

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Sometimes, depending on many factors, they can even lower their expedition landing crafts for close up views of these animals. For sure the experience will remain fixed on everyone. These are encounters that are one of a kind, and never repeat.

Sometimes, you may experience feeding, other times just cruising, other times just resting. It is all unique.

There is a slight increase in the frequency of encounters as you head into the days of the dry season, here, the cool waters are back, and the Galapagos Animals themselves are migrating from south to north.

During the hot season, migration happens in the opposite direction, and different species are involved. So really, there is no guarantee of when you can see cetaceans whales, nor what kind of species exactly you will see.

When cruise ships (some of them) spot action in the water they look out for what kind of spout, what kind of physical activity (breaching, surfacing, etc), what kind of dorsal fin, what shape of a tail (fluke), and other visual clues.

Only then, the ship's staff can come up with a positive ID of the species. A pair of binoculars is always helpful, and of course plenty of many eyes looking out in the horizon for Galapagos cetacean whales.

Recommended Reading

Ecuador & Galapagos (Insight Guides)

Ecuador & Galapagos (Insight Guides)
With 250 photos and tons of great information, this is an essential addition to your pre-Ecuador and -Galapagos reading! There are better guides if you are only interested in the islands, but for a combination trip taking in Ecuador as well, it's hard to beat.

Birds, Mammals, and Reptiles of the Galapagos Islands

Birds, Mammals, and Reptiles of the Galapagos Islands
Small enough to fit into your pocket, yet containing comprehensive information and pictures of all the species you will encounter in the islands, this book is a must-have for nature lovers. Let's face it, Galapagos is largely about the wildlife. This book will NOT disappoint, and you'll have a great memento of your time with the seals, penguins and tortoises!

Galapagos: The Islands That Changed the World

Galapagos: The Islands That Changed the World
Definitely NOT a tourist's guide, but if you're like me, and find the history and geography of the islands irresistible, then this is a title you ought to invest in. Stunningly illustrated, and painstakingly researched, those of you who have been there will be enchanted again -- and those of you who have not will begin planning your trip!

Moon Spotlight Galapagos Islands

Moon Spotlight Galapagos Islands
If you're a seasoned Galapagos regular, then you will probably prefer something weightier. But for first-timers looking for simple, down-to-earth advice on where to go, what to see and the best shopping and eating on the islands, this is the book for you. Small, well-priced, and reliable!

Galapagos: Islands Born of Fire

Galapagos: Islands Born of Fire
The 10th anniversary edition of this photographer's tour of the Galapagos Islands is a stunning book, worthy of anybody's coffee table. This is a perfect post-trip talking point -- a great way to remember what you've seen, and spread the word amongst your envious friends!


Galapagos Tours Available

Galapagos Land Tours at Finch Bay Hotel

Santa Cruz First Class Ship

Luxury Yacht La Pinta

Economic Galapagos Trips


If you have questions about Cetacean Whales, or if you'd like to request more information about our recommended Galapagos Island Tours to visit this Archipelago, you can Contact us here


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