Galapagos Islands Surfing

galapagos islands surfing

Galapagos Islands Surfing next to dolphins, sea lions, sea turtles and marine iguanas. It's an adventure you will remember for a lifetime.

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The Galapagos marine animals are very tame and love the surf in Galapagos as much as you will enjoy it too...

The main surfing spots in Galapagos are located on the Islands of San Cristobal and Santa Cruz.

Galapagos is very heavy surf and is only recommended for experienced surfers, and if you are planning a trip make sure you have at least 2 boards, one over 7 feet.

Breaking your board is a real possibility and your nearest surf shop is a long way away. Also make sure you have enough wax, leashes, sunscreen etc.

Galapagos Islands surfing on San Cristobal Island is a fantastic experience. There are more than a half-dozen outstanding waves, at least 4 of them world class, 2 of which are square tubes with Hawaiian power.

San Cristobal Island is unique because it picks up both North and South Pacific swells equally well.

Note that there are more surfing waves on other Islands in the Galapagos Archipelago, but most of them are closed off due to Galapagos National Park regulations and access to them is very difficult).

The waves on San Cristobal Island occur on the southwest and northwest facing sides of the Island where they are exposed to ground swells from both the North and South Pacific.

See the Best Galapagos Cruises Available to Visit these Islands

The Galapagos Islands have waves all year round, but the optimal Galapagos Islands surfing season is from December until May.

The reason is that the cold Humboldt current which travels northward up the coast of Chile and Peru during the Austral winter months of May to November creates prevailing onshore wind conditions during this period, with the wind and swell coming from the same direction.

The hot season from December to May sees the diminishing influence of this current, with hotter, sunnier offshore conditions ideal for Galapagos surfing.

The North swells occur most commonly from December until March. The south swell, despite pulses from December until February, is strongest during March, April and May.

These months are particularly good for South West swells which the island of San Cristobal tracks far better than the more southerly swells which tend to be more dominant from June until November.

If you want to experience Galapagos Islands surfing be prepared because it gets big but the surfing conditions are epic with strong offshore winds and swells that come out of deep water and wrap into beautiful bays.

Galapagos Islands Surfing Spots

Loberia:

Swell Direction: Southwest
Tide: All tides
Season: all year
Advanced Surfers Only
Calm Winds only, variable with wind conditions.

This spot is located 10 minutes South West of Puerto Baquerizo Moreno and depending on the wind conditions you can find 6 foot waves, rock bottom.

Tongo Reef:

Swell Direction: Southwest
Tide: All tides
Season: all year
Advanced Surfers Only
Calm Winds only, variable with wind conditions.

El CaƱon:

Swell Direction: Norths
Tide: All tides
Season: December through March.

A good alternative for surfing in the bay, this takes 5 minutes from the main town and is a left hand wave with a long wall over rock bottom. This waves grow up to 6 foot average.

Punta Carola:

Swell Direction: North
Tide: Low to Medium
Season: December through March.
Advanced Surfers only

Carola is probably the best Galapagos Islands surfing spot. Very fast and hollow. Located at 10 minutes boat ride East of Puerto Baquerizo Moreno, the predominant offshore winds creates waves of up to 10 feet average.

Surfing in Galapagos is truly and amazing experience, the water is clear, blue and has a perfect temperature of around 75 degrees.

Recommended Reading

Ecuador & Galapagos (Insight Guides)

Ecuador & Galapagos (Insight Guides)
With 250 photos and tons of great information, this is an essential addition to your pre-Ecuador and -Galapagos reading! There are better guides if you are only interested in the islands, but for a combination trip taking in Ecuador as well, it's hard to beat.

Birds, Mammals, and Reptiles of the Galapagos Islands

Birds, Mammals, and Reptiles of the Galapagos Islands
Small enough to fit into your pocket, yet containing comprehensive information and pictures of all the species you will encounter in the islands, this book is a must-have for nature lovers. Let's face it, Galapagos is largely about the wildlife. This book will NOT disappoint, and you'll have a great memento of your time with the seals, penguins and tortoises!

Galapagos: The Islands That Changed the World

Galapagos: The Islands That Changed the World
Definitely NOT a tourist's guide, but if you're like me, and find the history and geography of the islands irresistible, then this is a title you ought to invest in. Stunningly illustrated, and painstakingly researched, those of you who have been there will be enchanted again -- and those of you who have not will begin planning your trip!

Moon Spotlight Galapagos Islands

Moon Spotlight Galapagos Islands
If you're a seasoned Galapagos regular, then you will probably prefer something weightier. But for first-timers looking for simple, down-to-earth advice on where to go, what to see and the best shopping and eating on the islands, this is the book for you. Small, well-priced, and reliable!

Galapagos: Islands Born of Fire

Galapagos: Islands Born of Fire
The 10th anniversary edition of this photographer's tour of the Galapagos Islands is a stunning book, worthy of anybody's coffee table. This is a perfect post-trip talking point -- a great way to remember what you've seen, and spread the word amongst your envious friends!


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If you have questions about Galapagos Islands Surfing or if you'd like to request more details about our recommended Galapagos Island Tours to visit this Archipelago, You can Contact us here


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